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Friday, January 7th, 2011

Urbanoscope

I am a transplant to Louisville, and I must admit that the culture here has been difficult to adapt to, although I still try. There are many things I like about this city, but in terms of jobs, ambition, and looking toward the future, I have to say, these results are not surprising. I don’t get the impression, on the whole, that Louisville wants to move ahead. Every city has its faults. Clannish immaturity is Louisville’s. I hope that Louisville can retain its character while simultaneously opening up. It may not be possible. Young, educated workers do not want to recreate the 1970s in their work environment. I’m sorry if that’s harsh, but it’s the truth. – User “cccc2222″ commenting on Courier-Journal story about Louisville’s failure to achieve its economic ambitions

I’m going to be on Chicago Public Radio’s 848 Monday at 9am talking transportation as part of their “Mayor Monday” series. They might even be taking listener calls, so check it out if you’re in Chicago.

Also, I’ll be participating in a panel discussion on quality of place and product at an event on Building Prosperity in the Greater Akron Region on January 18th, sponsored by Greater Ohio and the Greater Akron Chamber of Commerce. There will be a lot of great speakers including Carol Coletta of CEOs for Cities, Julia Taylor of the Greater Milwaukee Committee, and Paul Grogan, president of the Boston Foundation, along with many state and local leaders. If you’re in the region and want more information, click here.

How’s this for an offer? The Center for Neighborhood Technology in Chicago is looking for people to host house party gatherings to discuss issues about the next mayoral race. If you’ve got a group who would be interested, let them know and they’ll supply staff and resources. If you support CNT and their policy recommendations, they’ll actually do the work in educating your friends on them.

The National Film Board of Canada created an interactive site called Out My Window showing panoramic views from residential high rises and such with 13 families living in them in various cities around the world.

Top Stories

1. Ben Schmitt: Broken windows in the Motor City: A Detroit exit journal. A reporter talks about giving up on his plan to stake a claim in Detroit’s revival, and moving to Pittsburgh. This is a really tough story. “Those people who helped me that night, as we waited more than two hours for the cops to arrive, illustrate the fight inside many residents desperate to turn Detroit around. For a while I believed in that fight. I purchased a home in one of the city’s stable neighborhoods nine years earlier because it felt real. I scoffed at other colleagues and editors who drove to work on the freeways and never spent a minute in the city they covered. But when I heard my daughters’ screams that evening, I knew I was gone. No more compromises.”

2. Gov. Ed Rendell: The NFL Thinks We’re a Nation of Wussies – Not urban related per se, but I liked this piece. – “To call off this game because of snow is further evidence of the ‘wussification’ of America. We seem to have lost our boldness, our courage, our sense of adventure and that frontier spirit that made this country the greatest nation in the world. A little snow, a potential traffic tie-up, a long trip home caused us to cancel a football game? Will Bunch, a writer for the Philadelphia Daily News, said that if football were played in China, 60,000 Chinese would have walked through the snow to the stadium doing advanced calculus as they did so. He’s probably right, and it’s no secret why the Chinese are dominating on the world stage.”

3. Ed Glaeser: America’s Revival Begins in Its Cities

4. Demography Matters pointed me at a very interesting blog called Spike Japan that talks about a side of Japan we rarely see, a side falling into Rust Belt ruin – “It may come as a shock to almost all of you living outside of Japan, and to some of you living in the center of its big cities, that as we approach the summer of 2009, swathes of the country are in ruins. It came as a shock to me, too, I have to confess, having lived for almost all of the last decade in the bubble of central Tokyo and only venturing outside occasionally to get to the airport, nearby beaches, and old friends in the mountains.”

The Pruitt-Igoe Myth

The trailer for a forthcoming documentary about the infamous Pruitt-Igoe public housing project in St. Louis, which was designed by starchitect Minoru Yamasaki – architect of the World Trade Center – and demolished in 1972. The trailer looks very interesting, so I’ll look forward to seeing the whole thing. (If the video doesn’t display, click here).

World and National Roundup

Miller-McCune: A road less traveled – Have we reached “peak travel” in the industrialized world?

Human Transit: Do roads pay for themselves? – Jarrett Walker looks at a recent study on the matter by the liberal non-profit US PIRG.

Daily Mail: Eco-light bulb cost to triple as ban on old style bulbs kicks in – well surprise, surprise.

Jim Russell: The End of Migration

The Atlantic: Dire States – more bad news about state finances

Alex Marshall: Distinctiveness: A Big Secret to Cities’ Success

Tim Campbell: Cities on the Prowl

Ed Glaeser: Behind the population shift – He credits it to housing regulation.

Business Insider: The 11 State Pension Funds That Will Run Out of Money – No surprise Illinois is #1, but Indiana is #3, and it also scores poorly in many other pension rankings though the pension situation does not even seem to be on the radar in the state. Odd.

New Geography: Washington opens the virtual office door

City Roundups

Next American City: Interview with NYC Parks Commissioner Adrian Benepe

LA Times: In a region that imports water, much goes to waste – A discussion of how rain that does fall in LA is basically just channeled off into the ocean instead of captured and reused.

Richard Longworth: A New Year for the Midwest

NYT: Chicago to redevelop US Steel site on lakefront

Chicago Tribune: Chicago’s transportation infrastructure weakening.

Chicago Tribune: Will Chicago think big after Daley?

Chicago Reporter: Loopholes – Despite the huge investment in TIF money, central Chicago actually lost jobs.

Megan Cottrell: Did public housing destroy Chicago’s black voter base? – I’m convinced there’s a Pulitzer for the person who tracks down where the former residents of Chicago’s demolished public housing projects went. A have a friend who is a cop in Gary who says there has been a big influx of ex-CHA residents there. Dittos a friend in Danville, Illinois. And I’ve heard similar reports out of Iowa. It immediately raises the question, was demolition of the projects less about helping the people who lived there than about a deliberate deracination program?

Indy Star: New projects could boost city’s entertainment districts – Quotes Yours Truly plus Kevin Kastner of Urban Indy.

Indianapolis Business Journal: Indianapolis startup scene gains momentum

Cleveland Plain Dealer: In hard times, Cleveland blacks’ views about immigrants shifting

NYT: Trying to overcome the stubborn blight of vacancies in Youngstown

Audrey Russo: Immigration and In-Migration in Pittsburgh

Pittsblog: The New Pittsburgh

Detroit Free Press: Risky best cost Detroit pension funds $480 million and Where the Detroit pension funds went wrong

NYT: In Michigan, Hamtramck pleads for a bankruptcy option

Welcome to Cleveburgh

Chris Briem had a great op-ed piece in the Post-Gazette this week touting a super-regional “Cleveburgh” corridor running from Pittsburgh to Cleveland. If a true mega-regional concept is ever really going to take off, the first step is probably this sort of cross-metro collaboration between neighbors. Here’s Briem’s Cleveburgh map:

Will the Boondoggles Never Cease?

UrbanCincy reports that in it’s latest five year construction plan, the Ohio Department of Transportation, an agency that doesn’t have enough funds to maintain the roads it has in a state in the middle of an acute economic and fiscal crisis, has allocated $809M to extend I-74 through Hamilton County.

Huh? I can’t believe anyone would put this high on a needs list, if indeed it is needed at all. I certainly don’t think so. Hamilton County actually has fewer people today than it did in 1970s, the region is growing more slowly than the national average, and it may already have more miles of six-eight lane freeway than any peer city in America.

Here’s a great chance for new Gov. Kasich to show his conservative bona fides. He cancelled the less expensive 3C rail project as something that state couldn’t afford. (I was also not a fan of that project). Here’s another one he can kill.

I’m a big believer in building infrastructure, and yes, even in building more roads where appropriate. But even among nominally fiscal conservative governors, it’s tough to find any highway boondoggle big enough that they are willing to cancel it. Here’s a perfect opportunity for Kasich to distinguish himself and step up to the plate.

Chicago Lakefront Trail

I think Copenhagen’s bike infrastructure is great, but it’s always great to get nice videos that come from other places too. Here’s one that Joe Peterangelo put together of the Chicago lakefront trail. (If the video doesn’t display, click here).

Post Script

Here’s another amazing early film, this done in 1897 by Thomas Edison of the intersection of State and Madison in Chicago. Hat tip How to Be a Retronaut. (If the video doesn’t display, click here).

9 Comments
Topics: Transportation
Cities: Chicago, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, St. Louis

9 Responses to “Urbanoscope”

  1. D says:

    If the only way that the 60k Chinese could get to the football stadium (somewhere amid a tangle of interstates and parking lots) was by driving, they’d probably call the game off there, too.

  2. Danny says:

    As an Eastsider I’d welcome a more direct ‘highway’ route to I-71 but it seems a little too late now (they’ve been wanting to connect the Eastside to I-71 since the 80s)!

    I’m all for a Light Rail around the Cincy area but against the 3C project. If it was indeed high speed [300mph+] then people would use it, but if they can drive it faster, it’ll never be used.

  3. n says:

    I will eat my hat if Kasich cancels I-74 through Cinci. Just look at his contributions from Automotive $292,055 and Oil & Gas $286,785.

  4. Ed Sanderson says:

    Just a note on the Chicago Bike Trail video: it appears to contain many loops and to have been shot from, say, Irving Park south to the Chicago River. It would have been much more impressive if it included the entire trail from Hollywood to Jackson Park. The north side portion may be more popular but for pure enjoyment, I recommend the section south of the Museum Campus.

  5. william says:

    “an icon misunderstood”

    I’d extend that to a metropolitan region misunderstood and unfairly maligned.

  6. Aaron Brown says:

    Ed beat me to it. It’s really too bad that the videographer doesn’t venture south of the Loop.

    One of the greatest things about the Lakefront Trail is that it spans 18 miles from north to south. Covering less than half of it barely does the trail justice, especially since the southern half is the much better section in my opinion (more space, more natural habitats, great views like Promontory Point, etc.).

    Going south would also show the diversity of users a bit better… Right now it looks like there are only white users.

  7. Joe Peterangelo says:

    I appreciate the comments concerning the lack of footage south of the Loop in my Chicago bike video. For what it’s worth, I spent the summer commuting from Uptown to the Loop, so that is where I filmed primarily. The video does include footage of the roundabout north of Hollywood Avenue. But I agree that it would have been better to include the southern half of the trail as well.

  8. Mike says:

    Regarding where did resident’s of Chicago’s former public housing projects go? This article in the City Journal says that 58% of Cook County Section 8 who used to live in the projects ended up in suburban areas south of Chicago. I am not from Chicago, but the article talks about problems in Riverdale and makes reference to blue collar areas that used to house former steel workers.

    http://www.city-journal.org/html/10_4_lets_end_housing.html

  9. john says:

    The best views of Chicago are definitely from the south side of the bike path along LSD starting at Navy Pier. God I miss that route. Use to live near Belmont harbor and often rode to Hyde Park for breakfast. And of course the many routes further north of the city are great too!

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